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News/Blog

News/Blog

March 7, 2015

After an unpredictable and wild legislative process that saw the bill transform several times, SB 118 finally passed the Senate and the House. It now awaits the governor's signature. This bill took more turns than a blind mouse in a mile long maze. In its final form, this bill is a compilation of three different concepts. First, community associations now have even better tools to get past mistakes and roadblocks in the governing documents that prevent amendments. Second, this bill ended up with owner protections against associations who fail to comply with the new open meeting laws in HB 99. The Utah Senate committee required these changes but, through simple inadvertence, they didn't make it into HB 99 before it passed both houses. So, they ended up in SB 118. Finally, SB 118 was amended to include significant clarifications to the procedures for an owner requesting association documents and a new penalty provision if condominium associations or other community associations fail to comply with owner document requests. These provisions came instead of another bill the Sponsor intended to run and were also part of a cooperative drafting effort between the CAI LAC and the senator.

This bill reflects a careful balance between owner and association rights. Those associations who take the "high road" of transparency and compliance with the law, will see no problems with these new penalty provisions. On the other hand, those management companies, HOA attorneys, and associations who tend to view HOA relationships with owners as an "us" - the board and its advisors, against "them" - the owners, had better beware. The days of obstructing owners who want to attend meetings or see association records are coming to an end. Owners in townhomes, condominiums, and homeowners associations will no longer have to stand for stonewalling, unexplained delay, exorbitant document copying charges, and other common strategies employed by the "low road" associations and their advisors who try to obstruct owners in their legitimate requests for association documents. Without needing an attorney, owners will be able to file a claim in small claims court and obtain a $500 damage award if the association fails to comply with either the open meeting or the document production laws. If an owner gets an attorney, he or she has a right to recover reasonable attorney fees.

This bill faced opposition from the "low road" attorneys who think that every law granting HOA owner rights is a threat to associations. And for those associations they advise, it probably is. Fortunately, that narrow minded opposition was fleeting, weak, and had no impact on the passage of the bill. The Utah legislature understood the importance of these types of balanced laws that support owners’ rights. How could they not – the same types of disclosure and access laws apply to the government they serve in!

John Morris, an attorney at Morris Sperry, is proud to have helped written the laws in this bill and to have testified in favor of this bill at the capitol. Morris Sperry applauds and supports this type of legislation. This new HOA law respects the balance between HOAs and their owners and helps remind as all who the HOA serves – the owners! The Utah community association institute HOA LAC (legislative action committee) worked hard on this bill with senators who have encountered the "low road" HOAs and were set on punishing them. The result was an excellent balance that good HOAs and their advisors will appreciate and respect. The work on this bill also continued and strengthened a good working relationship between the LAC and the Utah legislature.

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March 6, 2015

HB 304 passed through the Utah Senate Transportation and Public Utilities and Technology Committee and was placed on the Senate consent calendar yesterday. The odds of this bill passing just went up significantly. Community Associations could soon have a tool that allows them to get notice from utility companies before power and natural gas are shut off by the utility company for lack of payment. The board or management committee will have a chance to either enter the unit and winterize the unit or pay the bill and keep the utilities on. The Utah Legislative Action Committee of the Utah chapter of the Community Association Institute worked on and proposed this bill to help reduce damage from freezing pipes and flooding in community associations. Hopefully, this will turn into a valuable tool for Utah condominium associations and PUDs. 

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March 3, 2015

A veteran manager in the Utah HOA industry recently told a lawyer at Morris Sperry that he manages a Utah community association in which the board (with the help of an attorney member) has decided that it is just too hard to get the required 67% approval of owners necessary to approve declaration amendments. So, in a clever solution to this problem, they decided that they will treat any owner who does not respond to a voting request as a "yes" vote. Not surprisingly, amendments to their declarations are now easier than ever! In a perverted twist on voting, unless they get more than 33% of the owners to vote "no," every amendment the board propose passes without any problemYou don't need a single person to vote "yes," or at all, to get amendments to the declaration to pass!

It only takes a minute to think of the fun any owner in this association could have. Just get enough owners to demand a special meeting and vote on a particular issue and your are in business. Sometimes it only takes a handful of owners to demand a special meeting. The board must send out the ballots and apply the same rules they are applying to their amendments. You don't like that rental restrictions . . . demand a special meeting and watch the association board scramble to gather enough no votes to prevent your amendment from passing! 

After you quit laughing, a hard reality sets in. The ultimate effect of this voting rule is a letter from an attorney hired by an owner demanding that the association undue all of its bogus declaration amendments and threatening a lawsuit. It is not a question of whether these amendments will be challenged, it is just a question of when and how much it will cost the Association in attorney fees to come to their senses and undue the amendments passed using this laughable voting rule.

Naturally, our veteran manager expressed concern over this voting practice and was told by the board that an outside attorney had offered a legal opinion and that this was a legal way of voting. This is why community associations (condominiums, PUDs, Townhomes, and homeowners associations) should seek out the advice of the HOA attorneys at the Morris Sperry law office. Community association law is a complex area of law with no mercy on general practicioners and dabblers who have one HOA case a year. Would you go to a divorce lawyer for estate planning? Would you want someone who handles personal injury cases to file your bankruptcy? The lawyers at Morris Sperry have one focus - HOA law. That's all they do. Why would you go anywhere else for your HOA legal questions and risk the type of advice that this poor association received?  

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March 2, 2015

Condominiums, Townhomes, and Homeowner Associations should be aware that playing music or movies in the clubhouse or in any common area to a group of owners and/or their guests could be a copyright infringement. The test is whether the display is a "public performance." That legal and factual analysis depends on the makeup of the group of people in attendance. Private parties in HOA clubhouses have been held to be public performances for purposes of the music played at those events. Any association considering any organized event in a clubhouse or common area at which a movie or music will be offered by the Association, should contact Morris Sperry for a quick analysis or make sure whoever they source for that entertainment complies with copyright law. 

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February 26, 2015

Senate Bill 80 passed the Utah Senate yesterday and will now start its journey through the House of Representatives. SB 80, entitled "Homeowners' Association Reserve Fund" will require developers during the period of administrative control (the time developers control a new project) to provide a copy of the HOA governing documents and the most recent financials for the association in any sale of a unit or home in the community.

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February 26, 2015

Senate Bill 218 has passed out of committee in the Utah Senate and is now moving forward on the floor of the senate. This bill would make several changes to the Revised Nonprofit Corporation Act. Those HOAs that are incorporated, which 95% are, will be subject to the changes in all sorts of areas. Among other things, the new HOA law would: (1) clarify that notice and member participation by text, email, and other electronic means is acceptable in more circumstances, (2) eliminate the ability to use written ballots in a meeting if those ballots were solicited as part of an effort to take action without a meeting, (3) clarify that a proxy may be sent by text, email, or other means of electronic communication, (4) clarifying the right of board members to approve of board actions by text and email, (5) limit the authority of committees, (6) clarify that other types of notice may be permitted for meetings of the members and board, (7) clarifies the conflict of interest section application to relatives of board members, and (8) clarifies the contents of articles of restatement. 

If this bill passes, HOAs will need to update their procedures and practices applicable to daily decision making by board members and for member meetings and action. Morris Sperry will continue to monitor this bill and will be ready to provide any association with a complete overview of the changes if this new law passes.

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February 25, 2015

SB 118 was amended and substituted today to include an after-the-fact change to HB 99, the HOA open meetings bill that recently passed both houses of the Utah Legislature and is waiting for the governor's signature. If the governor signs it, HB 99 will require HOAs to have most board meetings and management committee meetings open to all owners and will require notice of most of those meetings to owners who request notice. Consistent with the desires of the Utah Senate, a provision was added to SB 118 that will modify the new HOA open meeting law to provide for a notice, right to cure, and cause of action for an owner against an HOA that refuses to comply with the open meeting laws. This cause of action will allow an owner to recover a $500 minimium damage amount, an order that the association comply, and attorney fees if an HOA ignores the new open meeting requirements after a warning from the owner. As one of the draftsman of both the original HB 99 open meeting bill and of the changes required by the Senate, John Morris and the Morris Sperry team of lawyers are ready to advise HOAs in Utah (condominiums, townhomes, homeowners associations) on what they need to do to comply with this new law and all HOA laws. As a frequent advocate of owner rights, the Morris Sperry attorneys also remain willing to assist owners with enforcing their rights under this law and any other.  

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February 25, 2015

HOA bill HB 304 passed out of the House Public Utilities and Technology Committee yesterday and is off to the floor of the Senate. As explained in an earlier news article on this site, this law would allow community associations to get advance notice when utilities will be turned off so that Associations can try to avoid freezing pipes and all the damage they cause in community associations. Representative Dixon Pitcher (Representative Pitcher's Website) of the Utah House of Representatives is sponsoring this bill. Representative Pitcher has been a great supporter of fair and balanced HOA laws and his constuents in District 10 should be pleased by his efforts. 

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February 24, 2015

John Morris of Morris Sperry testified in favor of Senate Bill 118 (SB 118) today in the House Business and Labor Committee with Senator Todd Weiler. (Senator Weiler's Website)  Senator Weiler graciously allowed his original senate bill to be expanded to provide more help for Community Associations trying to amend governing documents (declaration, bylaws, articles of incorporation). SB 118 will limit the restrictions on amending governing documents so that no more than 67% of the owners and mortgage holders are required to approve an amendment. It also fixes a couple of other limitations that exist in some documents, including in Senator Weiler's district. Morris Sperry commends the Utah legislature and Senator Todd Weiler for their serious consideration of the issues facing community associations and their willingness to help solve those problems. Owners and board members in Condominiums, Townhomes, and Homeowners Associations in Senator Weiler's district are well served by his Utah legislative efforts and for his balanced and practical approach to HOA legal issues.

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February 19, 2015

Agencies enforcing the Fair Housing Act have sometimes taken the position that community associations (HOAs, condominiums, townhomes, homeowners associations) must reasign limited common area parking to accomodate requests from disabled (handicapped) persons for more accessable parking. This reasignment can turn into a nightmare because limited common area parking is often assigned in deeds, CC&Rs, and plats. Owners typically rely on the location and convience of an assigned parking spot when making purchasing decisions. It is extremly disruptive and unfair to later force the owner to permanently trade for some parking spot that is often far less convenient after they have purchased. It is similar to informing an owner that they must trade backyards with their neighbor, or someone accross and down the street. Moreover, Associations are making these tough decisions under constant threat of a fair housing complaint that can cost thousands of dollars to defend.

In Commonwealth of Virginia v. Windsor Plaza Condominium Association, Inc., a Virginia Supreme Court found no fair housing act violation when the Assocaition refused to force a trade of limited common area parking assigned to owners, essentially stating that the Association had no right to confiscate the parking of another and therefore the requested accomodation was unreasonable. This case will provide new authority that Associations will have to consider when similar requests for accomodation are recieved.

This case highlights the difficulty Associations face when confronted with Fair Housing Act requests for accomodation. The Association undoubtedly spent tens of thousands of dollars to be vindicated in its ultimately correct decision, with no right to recover any of those attorney fees. If the Court had ruled the other way, the Association would have to pay the complainant's attorney fees, penalties, damages, and its own attorney fees. Morris Sperry understand the Utah Fair Housing Act (UFHA) and the Federal Fair Housing Act (FFHA) and can help associations navigate the difficult procedures that apply when responding to such as request. Moreover, Morris Sperry stays up to date on these and other cases to provide the very best substantive analysis possible.      

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October 3, 2013

The lawyers at Morris Sperry and the managers from FCS and Horizon enjoyed a good discussion and some intense training on the property insurance laws applicable to community associations. Working through the complicated statutes gave everyone a clearer understanding of what the law requires and how to better serve our mutual clients. Morris Sperry, FCS, and Horizon invest the time in training to better serve our clients. Morris Sperry is pleased to present these ongoing training sessions to management companies who share their never ending quest to provide better service to community associations in Utah.

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September 28, 2013

In the never ending quest to provide superior customer service, Morris Sperry staff members Sydney and Rachel attended the CAI day-long essentials course. This course introduces the basic legal and operational framework in community associations. Morris Sperry remains committed to increasing the general knowledge and proficiency of every member of our staff to better serve our clients. This is one more example of that commitment.

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September 14, 2013

John Morris of Morris Sperry was elected to be the president-elect of the local Utah CAI (Community Association Institute) Chapter. He will serve under the current president this year and take over as president next year. John looks forward to this new position in service to CAI and is hopeful that he can provide the same excellent leadership demonstrated by prior presidents.

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September 12, 2013

The Morris Sperry team and their guests attended and participated in the Utah CAI (Community Association Institute) Golf Tournament. It was a great opportunity to support the local CAI chapter. It was also a great opportunity to socialize and build relationships with people in the industry. Morris Sperry continues to support CAI and its important overall objective of education and training for owners, board members, managers, and all other participants in the industry.

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July 16, 2013

John Morris and Quinn Sperry have been selected to be speakers for the 35th annual Community Association Law Seminar in Las Vegas, Nevada in January 2014. The Community Association Law Seminar is the preeminent national seminar for community association lawyers around the country and around the world. Hundreds of HOA lawyers from around the world converge for three and half days of seminars on cutting edge legal issues affecting community associations. John and Quinn will present on the complicated issue of whether community associations can file for bankruptcy relief and the challenges a filing presents. They offer unique insights into this issue because of their strong backgrounds in both bankruptcy and community association law.

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June 23, 2013

Everyone at Morris Sperry took a break Friday for some great fun at Lagoon. It was a well-deserved retreat and the weather and day could not have been better.

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June 12, 2013

By demonstrating competence and skill in the service of our clients, Sydney Allen has been advanced to a legal assistant position at Morris Sperry. She has demonstrated reliability, dedication, and a strong intellect and we intend to fully utilize those capabilities to efficiently and promptly serve our clients. Morris Sperry congratulates Sydney on this quick advancement and looks forward to challenging her in her new position.

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June 8, 2013

The attorneys and staff of Morris Sperry had a wonderful time hosting our guests at the Morris Sperry open house. Thank you so much to all who attended and made the evening enjoyable. Many family members, clients and friends attended and were treated to great hor d'oeuvres and service from the Blended Table. Thank you again to all who attended and we hope you had as much fun as we did.

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May 30, 2013

In a very interactive session, several managers from Advanced Community Services participated in training with the attorneys at Morris Sperry. As usual, the lively discussion was helpful for everyone involved and reflects both ACS's and Morris Sperry's dedication to quality HOA management through intensive training. Anyone looking for a good HOA manager or a good HOA lawyer should start by looking at those people who dedicate serious time to sharpening their skills and expanding their knowledge. Morris Sperry and the managers they provide training to demonstrate that commitment.

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May 15, 2013

Several managers and assistant managers from FCS Community Services were treated to two hours of training on community association rules by the attorneys at Morris Sperry. The interaction and discussion was helpful for everyone. A second session is planned in the future to discuss in further detail various issues that arise in the drafting and interpretation of rules.

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January 10, 2015

On January 6, 2016 the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), filed a complaint (Eugene and Galina Ovsishcher v. Trump village Section IV Inc.) against a housing cooperative in New York seeking not less than $48,000 in penalties in addition to damages and attorney fees. The claim is based on failing to grant a reasonable accomodation under the Fair Housing Act. The complainants were a husband and wife and the husband, a combat military veteran of afghanistan and Kosovo, had received a recommendation from his psychiatrist to obtain an animal to assist with psychiatric disabilities related to his service. Not only did the cooperative and its leader refuse to allow the dog, they immediately began retaliating against the couple because of their request. The Association, or its insurance company, is likelely to spend tens of thousands of dollars in the defense of this claim and will also likely end up paying attorney fees, penalties, and damages. With a little competent legal advice early on, this matter would likely have been handled completely different and the association could have avoided this claim and the bad publicity it created. Morris Sperry always recommends seeking competent legal advice when an association receives a request for service or emotional support animals or other requests for accomodation related to any claimed or apparent disability.

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October 31, 2014

Morris Sperry has confirmed their continuing sponsorship of the local Community Association Institute Chapter. Morris Sperry once again agreed to sponsor the local Chapter at the highest level - a diamond Sponsorship. Morris Sperry stands behind the local chapter and its mission to educate board members and industry participants.  

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July 9, 2014

In a recent decision, the Utah Supreme Court held, a condominium property manager owed no duty to a resident in the complex who tripped and fell on tree shoots in the lawn. In a lengthy decision addressing several legal theories, the Utah Supreme Court stated that the property manager was not a "possessor" or the land, did not owe an independent duty to the owner, and had generally complied with its contractual obligations. One lesson is clear from the decision. If a property manager takes any action to contribute to a dangerous or unsafe condition, the manager may be liable. Although the court was concerned that the property manager may have contributed to the danger caused by the tree shoots through repeated mowing instead of proper removal, the issue had not been properly addressed by the plaintiff and was therefore disregarded. The core lesson for associations and managers is to always strive to resolve unsafe conditions in HOAs. Nobody wants anyone to get injured enjoying the open space in an HOA, regardless of legal concerns.

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June 27, 2014

Houston is a unique city in that it has no zoning. Theoretically, anyone can build anything they want anywhere. In reality the ability to develop remains constrained in other ways that prevent building anything anywhere. In a recent and unique case a developer considered building a large mixed use project near single family residential areas. The residential owners sued and obtained a verdict for over a million dollars under the theory that just the plan for the new development created a "nuisance" that damaged them. Although this is an interesting case, it would be very difficult to bring a case in Utah under the same legal theory. More importantly, most new construction in Utah is subject to some zoning regulation. This case remains, however, an interesting result of the never ending tension between existing land owners and developers of nearby parcels. Morris Sperry is uniquely situated to assist both existing owners and developers in these situations.

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June 12, 2014

In a recent study performed by CAI, only 10% of owners expressed some level of dissatisfaction with their HOA. Almost two-thirds of owners rate their association experience as positive, with 26% indicating that they are neutral. The study goes on to confirm that 90% of owners say association board members serve the best interests of their communities, 92% of association owners are on friendly terms with their association board members, and 70% confirm that they believe the association rules protect and enhance property values. Although the media and critics tend to focus on the occasional association dispute, most associations are well run and the owners in them are very happy with what the association is doing.

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January 10, 2014

In a well attended event, the CAI Chapter put on a mock annual meeting and a panel of experts offered insight into various issues. Quinn Sperry of Morris Sperry moderated and the rest of the team at Morris Sperry acted out a "typical' annual meeting. There were lots of laughs as issues involving comfort animals, defamation, guns, video recorders, obstructive owners, alcohol, meeting notices, and proxies were raised and discussed. It was great training and good fun for everyone who attended.

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December 19, 2013

Here is another example of the need for HOAs to carefully select their D&O policy. A California community association lost its lawsuit against State Farm after State Farm refused to cover a lawsuit against the HOA under the D&O policy because the plaintiffs had not claimed compensatory damages. You might think you have D&O coverage to cover lawsuits against board members and the association, but if the D&O policy does not cover non-monetary claims or limits the type of claims or remedies sought, you may not have any defense. Every community association should check with its agent to make sure the board members understand the scope of coverage for their D&O policy.

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December 13, 2013

A South Carolina jury awarded an owner in a condominium complex $550,000 in actual damages and $340,000 in punitive damages against the board of a condominium association and the association. The association and board members apparently handed out a flyer to owners identifying a sex offender with the same name as an owner in the complex. While the person on the flyer was not the owner in the project, the association and board members continue to say it was even after other owners challenged the claim. One of the board members also apparently called the owner's bank and told a loan officer that the owner was a sex offender. The board was apparently upset that the owner had not paid assessments on time.

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November 30, 2013

On November 25, 2013, the Justice Department filed a lawsuit against a Minnesota HOA claiming discrimination under the Fair Housing Act against families with children. A key element of the complaint was a rule against "playing" on the lawn imposed against all owners. The complaint also referenced several association enforcement actions and warnings with references to children and children playing on the lawn. The lawsuit seeks injunctive relief and damages. Morris Sperry has successfully defended associations against similar fair housing act enforcement actions which in Utah are brought by the Utah Anti Discrimination and Labor Division.

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November 4, 2013

After a five-week trial (yes . . . five weeks), a California Orange County Jury awarded a homeowner in a condominium association $15,000 in damages for exposure to second hand smoke. The lawsuit was brought against the condominium association, the manager, and the tenants. The Plaintiff prevailed on both negligence and nuisance claims against the Association, essentially due to the Association's failure to take sufficient action upon receiving complaints. Following trial, the Court awarded the Plaintiff another $54,000 in attorney fees pursuant to the attorney fee provision in the Declaration. Including costs of defense for a two-year lawsuit and a five-week trial, the total loss to the Association likely exceeded $300,000. This case stands as a good lesson on the shifting attitudes regarding smoking and the Association's need to carefully consider its obligations in the governing documents.

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